Search
  • #CrimComm

The Bookshelf (for Science Communicators)



We thought it might be fun and helpful to create a virtual bookshelf of various books on science communication and/or on different techniques for presenting ideas. The following books are what is currently on our virtual shelf (aka Kindle).


If there was ever only one book that had to be mandatory reading in all graduate programs, it should be this one. Clear, concise and super helpful, Duarte's slide:ology helps presenters rethink how and why you use powerpoint presentations, teaching you how to employ them much more effectively than the largely mentally and visually abusive slideshows to which we are all too accustomed.



A key concept for any science communicator has to be 'stickness' - how do you take solutions for often complex problems and make them 'stick' with audiences? This bestseller helps unpack some of the mysteries around making messages stick.













This is a great introductory read for anyone just starting out in science communication. Lots and lots of tips on what to do and what not to do! One of us actually teaches chunks of this book in her evidence based policy class.














Here is the antidote to all of those fussy slide shows with 8 million words and pics no one can see or read. And, as you can see here, presentation zen also comes in video format for those or you who are tired of reading.













Loved Berger's book "Contagious" (on how ideas spread), so added this to the library and just started to dig in. A central premise? You need different strokes to convince different folks. You'd think this would be obvious, but ... we see researchers fail to switch gears ... a lot.
















We haven't started reading this one yet, but c'mon ... that title is catchy. What is Olson's book about? It's about how to communicate complex ideas in ways that are both informative and compelling.

6 views

© 2019 by # CrimComm. Proudly created with Wix.com